Craniosacral Therapy courses 2017

Craniosacral Therapy module 1 – The healing power of stillness

Mallorca – 4, 5, 9, 10 November 2017

Craniosacral Therapy module 2 – Venous sinus drainage

Mallorca – 2, 3, 9, 10 December 2017

Craniosacral Therapy module 1 – The healing power of stillness

The American osteopath, Rollin Becker, tells us that stillness is the key to healing the body-mind as stillness liberates the potency contained within the breath of life. This thirty-hour course is all about stillness, taught within the context of craniosacral biodynamics. This is a practical course taught with the intention that all participants will carry away skills that integrate into their current therapy or bodywork practice.

Module 1 introduces all the basic concepts of biodynamic craniosacral therapy but with special attention on working with the emotional body.

Generally, body-oriented approaches to psychotherapy use physical or psychological exercises to bring unconscious material (held as tensions in the body) to the surface where it can be consciously processed through some form of spoken dialogue.

Apart from some notable and important exceptions (addressed in module 3), craniosacral therapy offers a way of integrating unresolved experiences held in body without the need for verbal processing.

This course will look at the way in which we hold and organise unresolved experiences using the transverse structures of the body (thoracic inlet, respiratory diaphragm, pelvic bowl, etc.) The craniosacral techniques taught are those we can use to bring attention to and invite change to these structures.

Throughout the course we will search for a movement towards holism – not as an idea but as a shift in perception. This shift allows us to discover the stillness within our own and within our patient’s physical organisation. Out of this stillness the intentions of the healing process can manifest.

The syllabus will cover:

  • A brief history of the development of craniosacral therapy, with special emphasis on current biodynamic thinking.
  • An exploration of the concepts of inherent health, breath of life and primary respiration
  • An exploration of the neutral, the relational field and levels of stillness
  • An exploration of the mid-tide, long-tide, and still-points
  • Palpating and perceiving tides and rhythms
  • The transverse diaphragms and their role in organising experience
  • Practitioner and patient resources

Craniosacral Therapy module 2 – Venous sinus drainage

Andrew Taylor Still, the founder of osteopathy always reminded his students that the physician’s task “was to remove with gentleness all perceived mechanical obstructions to the free-flowing rivers of life (blood, lymph, and cerebro-spinal fluid). Nature would then do the rest.”

This thirty hour course focuses of the movement of fluids through the body and teaches craniosacral techniques to work with problems of fluid congestion and stagnation such as swelling, headaches, sinusitus, etc.

The seminar will be structured around a specific craniosacral protocol called ‘venous sinus drainage’ – designed to encourage lymphatic drainage, especially from the head. This routine also promotes blood supply and encourages relaxation of the sinus cavities.

The seminar will also look at the reflection between head and pelvis and also explore the connection between fluid stagnation and emotional and mental stagnation.

The syllabus will cover:

  • The Primary Respiratory System.
  • Primary Respiration as motion in fluids and tissues.
  • The Reciprocal Tension Mechanism (RTM).
  • Perceiving the membranes of the RTM.
  • Mid-Tide and Cranial Rhythmic Impulse.
  • Palpating motion at occiput, temporal, parietal and frontal.
  • Relationship between the sphenoid and occiput.
  • Cranial bones and the membranes of the RTM.
  • Venous Sinus Drainage protocol.
  • Trauma and resources.
  • Practice of Venous Sinus Drainage and integration.

Craniosacral Therapy and Thai Yoga Massage courses for 2016-2017

Craniosacral Therapy module 1 – The healing power of stillness

Mallorca –  19, 20, 26, 27 November 2016

Zagreb – 14, 15, 16, 17, 18 December 2016

Craniosacral Therapy module 2 – Venous sinus drainage

Dates to be confirmed. Email for details

Craniosacral Therapy module 3 – Trauma and happiness

Dates to be confirmed. Email for details

Thai Yoga Massage training

Mallorca – 14/15 January; 21/22 January; 11/12 February; 18/19 February 2017

Barcelona – 11/12 March; 25/26 March; 1/2 April, 20/21 May 2017

 

 

 

Thai Massage training, Barcelona 2017

Xperimenta Espacio Poblenau, Barcelona

This 60-hour course is taught as four weekend classes: 11/12 March; 25/26 March; 1/2 April, 20/21 May 2016.

Each weekend class is complete and concentrates on one area of the body. Successful completion of the course is acknowledged with a certificate issued by The School of Therapeutic Bodywork in London.

This course is suited to experienced massage practitioners and bodyworkers who want to extend their repertoire as well as to complete beginners exploring massage with a view to work or simply to practice with family and friends.

This course has proven invaluable to many people who have studied in Thailand and returned overwhelmed by techniques and theories. It helps them integrate their experience and apply the massage within a clinical rather than a holiday context.

The course is also well suited to yoga teachers wishing to develop their bodywork and adjustment skills.

Students will learn a complete one and a half hour routine suited to general practice. They will also learn variations for working with pregnant women; a one-hour routine; a chair based massage and adaptations for using Thai techniques on the massage table.

Traditional Thai medicine is based on a system of 72,000 channels called ’sen’ through which, it is said, energy is transformed and distributed in the human body. In Thailand much of the theory of this system has been lost. What remains is mostly hidden from Westerners unfamiliar with the language and culture to which the medical system belongs.

Most Western understanding of the sen is based on an ancient series of diagrams outlining the ten major sen used in Traditional Thai Massage. In the West these are often likened to the meridians used in acupuncture or shiatsu and, very often, aspects of those systems are thrown in to make up for what is not known of the Thai system.

This course teaches the myofascial approach to Thai Massage developed by Howard Evans during sixteen years of practice and teaching. This approach is described in his book, ‘A Myofascial Approach to Thai Massage‘, published in January 2009 by Churchill Livingstone.

The myofascial approach to Thai Massage teaches the sen as myofascial pathways, similar to those used in Structural Integration (or Rolfing) and described in Tom Myers book ‘Anatomy Trains’. This approach brings clarity to the massage allowing the practitioner to relax into the work, and invite ever-deeper levels of relaxation, stillness and healing in the receiver.

This particular approach also suits yoga teachers and practitioners interested in understanding and integrating new research on the importance of connective tissue and fascia in sickness and in health.

Thai Massage is practiced on the floor. There is no need for oil so the receiver can remain lightly clothed. This makes it one of the most versatile and portable massage techniques available. Many of the techniques can also be incorporated into couch based massage routines.

The course includes work on practitioner posture, breathing, rhythm, self-awareness, attention and concentration. The aim is to develop a style of massage as beneficial to the giver as to the receiver.

Students will need to bring a yoga mat, two blankets, a small pillow and loose, comfortable, cotton clothes.

Craniosacral Therapy Module 1 – Working with stillness. London

Exploring Dynamic Stillness: Craniosacral Therapy Module 1 – Working with stillness

From bodywork to a silent psychotherapy

Module 1 introduces all the basic concepts of biodynamic craniosacral therapy but with special attention on working with the emotional body.

Generally, body-oriented approaches to psychotherapy use physical or psychological exercises to bring unconscious material held as tensions in the body to the surface where it can be consciously processed through some form of spoken dialogue.

Apart from some notable and important exceptions (addressed in Module 3), craniosacral therapy offers a way of integrating unresolved experiences held in body without the need for verbal processing.

This course will look at the way in which we hold and organise unresolved experiences using the transverse structures of the body (thoracic inlet, respiratory diaphragm, pelvic bowl, etc.) The craniosacral techniques taught are those we can use to bring attention to and invite change to these structures.

Throughout the course we will search for a movement towards holism – not as an idea but as a shift in perception. This shift allows us to discover the stillness within our own and within our patient’s physical organisation. Out of this stillness the intentions of the healing process can manifest unbounded.

The syllabus will cover:

  • A brief history of the development of craniosacral therapy with special emphasis on current biodynamic thinking.
  • An exploration of the concepts of inherent health, breath of life and primary respiration.
  • An exploration of the neutral, the relational field and levels of stillness.
  • An exploration of the mid-tide, long-tide, and still-points.
  • Palpating and perceiving tides and rhythms.
  • The transverse diaphragms and their role in organising experience.
  • Practitioner and patient resources

This thirty hour course is taught over 11/12 September and 9/10 October

Thai Massage training – Mallorca starts 28 March 2015

Thai Yoga Massage training course with Howard Evans – Four weekends 45 hours

28-29 March, 11-12 April, 25-26 April, 9-10 May 2015

This 45-hour course is taught as four weekend classes. Each weekend class is complete and concentrates on one area of the body. Successful completion of the course is acknowledged with a certificate issued by The School of Therapeutic Bodywork in London.

There is additional optional module at the end of 15 hours (one weekend) that is not included in this course. The purpose of the extra module is to practice and integrate the learned skills even more. If you combine this training with the optional module you will be issued a training certificate of 60 hours.

This course is suited to experienced massage practitioners and bodyworkers who want to extend their repertoire as well as to complete beginners exploring massage with a view to work or simply to practice with family and friends.

This course has proven invaluable to many people who have studied in Thailand and returned overwhelmed by techniques and theories. It helps them integrate their experience and apply the massage within a clinical rather than a holiday context.

The course is also well suited to yoga teachers wishing to develop their bodywork and adjustment skills.

Students will learn a complete one and a half hour routine suited to general practice. They will also learn variations for working with pregnant women; a quick one-hour routine and a short sitting massage.

Traditional Thai medicine is based on a system of 72,000 channels called ’sen’ through which, it is said, energy is transformed and distributed in the human body. In Thailand much of the theory of this system has been lost. What remains is mostly hidden from Westerners unfamiliar with the language and culture to which the medical system belongs.

Most Western understanding of the sen is based on an ancient series of diagrams outlining the ten major sen used in Traditional Thai Massage. In the West these are often likened to the meridians used in acupuncture or shiatsu and, very often, aspects of those systems are thrown in to make up for what is not known of the Thai system.

This course teaches the myofascial approach to Thai Massage developed by Howard Evans during sixteen years of practice and teaching. This approach is described in his book, ‘A Myofascial Approach to Thai Massage‘, published in January 2009 by Churchill Livingstone.

The myofascial approach to Thai Massage teaches the sen as myofascial pathways, similar to those used in Structural Integration (or Rolfing) and described in Tom Myers book ‘Anatomy Trains’. This approach brings clarity to the massage allowing the practitioner to relax into the work, and invite ever-deeper levels of relaxation, stillness and healing in the receiver.

This particular approach also suits yoga teachers and practitioners interested in understanding and integrating new research on the importance of connective tissue and fascia in sickness and in health.

Thai Massage is practiced on the floor. There is no need for oil so the receiver can remain lightly clothed. This makes it one of the most versatile and portable massage techniques available. Many of the techniques can also be incorporated into couch based massage routines.

The course includes work on practitioner posture, breathing, rhythm, self-awareness, attention and concentration. The aim is to develop a style of massage as beneficial to the giver as to the receiver.

A Myofascial Approach to Thai Massage – PDF version

 

The copyright for this book has reverted to me. You can now buy a PDF version of the book direct from me. Just click on the ‘Paypal’ button, complete payment and I will send you a link to the PDF file on dropbox. You can download from dropbox and print yourself. The price for this version is €15.00.

Thai Yoga Massage course – Zunray, Palma de Mallorca

This 60-hour course is taught as four weekend classes. Each weekend class is complete and concentrates on one area of the body. Successful completion of the course is acknowledged with a certificate issued by The School of Therapeutic Bodywork in London.

This course is suited to experienced massage practitioners and bodyworkers who want to extend their repertoire as well as to complete beginners exploring massage with a view to work or simply to practice with family and friends.

This course has proven invaluable to many people who have studied in Thailand and returned overwhelmed by techniques and theories. It helps them integrate their experience and apply the massage within a clinical rather than a holiday context.

The course is also well suited to yoga teachers wishing to develop their bodywork and adjustment skills.

Students will learn a complete one and a half hour routine suited to general practice. They will also learn variations for working with pregnant women; a quick one-hour routine and a short sitting massage.

Traditional Thai medicine is based on a system of 72,000 channels called ’sen’ through which, it is said, energy is transformed and distributed in the human body. In Thailand much of the theory of this system has been lost. What remains is mostly hidden from Westerners unfamiliar with the language and culture to which the medical system belongs.

Most Western understanding of the sen is based on an ancient series of diagrams outlining the ten major sen used in Traditional Thai Massage. In the West these are often likened to the meridians used in acupuncture or shiatsu and, very often, aspects of those systems are thrown in to make up for what is not known of the Thai system.

This course teaches the myofascial approach to Thai Massage developed by Howard Evans during sixteen years of practice and teaching. This approach is described in his book, ‘A Myofascial Approach to Thai Massage‘, published in January 2009 by Churchill Livingstone.

The myofascial approach to Thai Massage teaches the sen as myofascial pathways, similar to those used in Structural Integration (or Rolfing) and described in Tom Myers book ‘Anatomy Trains’. This approach brings clarity to the massage allowing the practitioner to relax into the work, and invite ever-deeper levels of relaxation, stillness and healing in the receiver.

This particular approach also suits yoga teachers and practitioners interested in understanding and integrating new research on the importance of connective tissue and fascia in sickness and in health.

Thai Massage is practiced on the floor. There is no need for oil so the receiver can remain lightly clothed. This makes it one of the most versatile and portable massage techniques available. Many of the techniques can also be incorporated into couch based massage routines.

The course includes work on practitioner posture, breathing, rhythm, self-awareness, attention and concentration. The aim is to develop a style of massage as beneficial to the giver as to the receiver.

Students will need to bring a yoga mat, two blankets, a small pillow and loose, comfortable, cotton clothes.

http://www.zunray.com/en/

Yoga retreat with Britt Sondergaard In Bornholm, Denmark

 
I am very happy to have been invited to work with my good friend Britt Sondergaard on a retreat she runs in Bornholm, Denmark.

I will be working in Bornholm for the week of 21 thru 27 July.

During the week I will be offering craniosacral therapy and bodywork sessions. Each treatment will be individual and take of account of specific ailments.

In addition I will offer a massage workshop – teaching a head, neck and shoulder routine suitable for working with friends, family and lovers. This beautiful routine uses a combination of techniques drawn from Traditional Thai Massage and craniosacral therapy and will wake up the healing magic in your hands.

You don’t need any special equipment to learn and you won’t need any special tools to practice. Most of the routine can be given seated – either on the floor or on a chair but you will also explore variations for working with your partner lying down.

http://www.yogabalancen.net/

http://www.yogabalancen.net/side4.html